Contact

(979) 845-6510
bushschoolscowcroft@tamu.edu

Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220


Contact

(979) 845-6510
bushschoolscowcroft@tamu.edu

Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220

Senior Fellows


Elizabeth Cameron, PhD

Elizabeth CameronDr. Elizabeth Cameron is the Nuclear Threat Initiative’s (NTI) Vice President for Global Biological Policy and Programs and a Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Prior to working at NTI, Dr. Cameron served as the Senior Director for Global Health Security and Biodefense on the White House National Security Council (NSC) staff, where she was instrumental in the development and launch of the Global Health Security Agenda.

From 2010 to 2013, Dr. Cameron served as the Office Director for Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) and the Senior Advisor for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Defense programs. In these roles, she oversaw implementation of the geographic expansion of the Nunn‐Lugar CTR program and, as a result, was awarded the Office of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Civilian Service. From 2003 to 2010, she oversaw the expansion of Department of State Global Threat Reduction programs and supported the expansion and extension of the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, a multilateral framework to improve global CBRN security. From 2001 to 2003, she served as a manager of policy research for the American Cancer Society.

After earning her PhD, Dr. Cameron served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow in the health policy office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, where she worked on the Patients’ Bill of Rights, medical privacy, and legislation to improve the quality of cancer care. Dr. Cameron holds a PhD in biology from the Human Genetics and Molecular Biology Program at the Johns Hopkins University and a BA in biology from the University of Virginia.


Dennis Carroll, PhD

Dr. Dennis Carroll Dr. Dennis Carroll currently serves as the Director of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Emerging Threats Division. In this position Dr. Carroll is responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for the Agency's programs addressing new and emerging disease threats. He provided overall strategic leadership for the Agency’s response to the West Africa Ebola epidemic.

Dr. Carroll was initially detailed to USAID from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a senior public health advisor in 1991. In 1995 he was named the Agency's Senior Infectious Diseases advisor, responsible for overseeing the Agency's programs in malaria, tuberculosis, antimicrobial resistance, disease surveillance, as well as neglected and emerging infectious diseases. In this capacity Dr. Carroll was directly involved in the development and introduction of a range of new technologies for disease prevention and control, including: community-based delivery of treatment of onchocerciasis, rapid diagnostics for malaria, new treatment therapies for drug resistant malaria, intermittent therapy for pregnant women and “long-lasting” insecticide treated bednets for prevention of malaria. He was responsible for the initial design and development of the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI). Dr. Carroll officially left CDC and joined USAID in 2005 when he assumed responsibility for leading the USAID response to the spread of avian influenza. He currently oversees the Agency’s implementation of the Emerging Threats program in more than 30 countries across Africa and Asia.

Dr. Carroll has a doctorate in biomedical research with a special focus in tropical infectious diseases from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was a Research Scientist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory where he studied the molecular mechanics of viral infection. Dr. Carroll has received awards from both CDC and USAID, including the 2006 USAID Science and Technology Award for his work on malaria, including the design of PMI, and avian influenza, the 2008 Administrator’s Management Innovation Award for his management of the Agency’s Avian and Pandemic Influenza program, in 2015 USAID’s Distinguished Service Award, and a 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award from Texas A&M University.


Herbert J. Davis, PhD

Professor of Strategic Management and International Affairs, George Washington University

Dr. Herbert J. Davis Dr. Herbert Davis serves as a Professor of Strategic Management and International Affairs at George Washington University, and during the 2016-2017 academic year, he served as the Senior Scowcroft Fellow in International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Dr. Davis has more than thirty-five years of experience with business and international affairs, and his geographic areas of interest and expertise include South Asia, the Middle East, and the Gulf Region (GCC). He has held senior management positions with the United States Chamber of Commerce, where he was directly involved in founding three bilateral business councils representing U.S. corporate interests in Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Bahrain. In addition, he founded and managed the South Asia Regional Energy Coalition (SAREC) at the Chamber. While at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Dr. Davis worked closely with the Executive Office of the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations and various departments of the U.S. government. From 2010 to 2013, he was the Team Lead and Acting Chief of Party for the USAID-funded Iraq Financial Development Project under contract to AECOM International Development, Inc.

Dr. Davis was named Global Management Research Professor at the George Washington University in 1996 for his contributions to the international development of the School of Business and to the George Washington University. Earlier in his career, he was the Provost and visiting professor of business at Indiana University, with responsibility for the University’s international campus in Selangor, Malaysia. Professor Davis has served as a visiting scholar at the East-West Center, senior Fulbright professor to Bangladesh, and as a visiting professor at several universities worldwide. He is the Senior Editor of National Culture and International Management in East Asia, published by Thomson Business Press (UK) and Management in India: Trends and Transition, published by Sage, India. Dr. Davis received his PhD from Louisiana State University.


Joseph Fair, PhD, MPH

Dr. Joseph Fair Dr. Joseph Fair is a modern-day international disease detective that travels the world in search of plagues before they become global disasters. In addition, Dr. Fair is a scientist, business entrepreneur, media consultant, and builder and creator of public health programs. He has more than eighteen years of experience in building, sustaining, and nurturing successful research and development programs in more than thirty countries. Fair has authored or coauthored more than forty-five peer reviewed articles on virology, public health, emergency response, and virus hunting in disease "hotspots" around the world. In addition, he works as an international outbreak responder and has been highlighted by 60 Minutes, the cover of the Washington Post, CNN, Al Jazeera, NPR, Vice News, NBC News, and other media outlets.

Dr. Fair currently serves as an Emergency Responder with the International Medical Corps; a Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University; a Senior Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution; and as the founder and proprietor of Virion HLTH. He holds a PhD in molecular biology and a Master of Public Health in tropical medicine from Tulane University and a BS in biology/biological sciences from Loyola University, New Orleans.


Richard J. Golsan, PhD

Dr. Richard J Golsan Dr. Richard Golsan is University Distinguished Professor and Distinguished Professor of French at Texas A&M University and a Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. In addition, he currently serves as the Director of the France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre d'Excellence) and as the Editor of South Central Review. His areas of research focus on modern and contemporary France and Europe as well as modern genocides and historical trials.

Dr. Golsan has authored or edited more than a dozen books and published more than 100 articles and book chapters. His latest books are The Vichy Past in France Today: Corruptions of Memory (Lexington Books, 2016) and The Trial That Never Ends: Hannah Arendt's 'Eichmann in Jerusalem' in Retrospect, co-edited with Sarah M. Misemer (University of Toronto Press, 2017). Dr. Golsan has been awarded the Palmes Academiques by the French government. He holds a PhD and an MA in French literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a BA in French and geology from Washington and Lee University.


Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD

Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD Dr. Peter Hotez currently serves as Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine, where he is also the Director of the Texas Children’s Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) and Texas Children’s Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics. He is a Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. In addition, he is University Professor at Baylor University and Fellow in Disease and Poverty at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy. Dr. Hotez is an internationally recognized physician-scientist in neglected tropical diseases and vaccine development. As head of the Texas Children’s CVD, he leads the only product development partnership for developing new vaccines for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease, and SARS/MERS, diseases affecting hundreds of millions of children and adults worldwide. In 2006, at the Clinton Global Initiative, he cofounded the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases to provide access to essential medicines for hundreds of millions of people.

Dr. Hotez served previously as President of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and he is founding Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Dr. Hotez has authored more than 400 original papers and is the author of the acclaimed Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases (ASM Press, 2008) and the recently released Blue Marble Health: An Innovative Plan to Fight Diseases of the Poor amid Wealth (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016). He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, and in 2011, he was awarded the Abraham Horwitz Award for Excellence in Leadership in Inter-American Health by the Pan American Health Organization of the WHO. From 2014 to 2016, he served in the Obama administration as U.S. Envoy, focusing on vaccine diplomacy initiatives between the U.S. government and countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

In 2015, Dr. Hotez emerged as a major national thought leader on the Zika epidemic in the Western Hemisphere and globally. He was among the first to predict Zika’s emergence in the U.S. and is called upon frequently to testify before the U.S. Congress. He served on infectious disease task forces for two consecutive Texas governors. For these efforts, in 2017, he was named by Fortune Magazine as one of the thirty-four most influential people in health care. In addition, as both a vaccine scientist and autism dad, he has led national efforts to defend vaccines and has served as an ardent champion of vaccines, going up against a growing national “antivaxx” threat. He appears frequently on television (including BBC, CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC) and radio as well as in newspaper interviews (including the New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal). Dr. Hotez holds a PhD in biochemistry from Rockefeller University, an MD from Weil Cornell Medical College, and a BS in molecular biophysics from Yale University.


Rebecca Katz, PhD, MPH

Rebecca KatzDr. Rebecca Katz is an associate professor and Co-director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University and a Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Prior to Georgetown, she spent ten years at the George Washington University as an associate professor of Health Policy and Emergency Medicine in the Milken Institute School of Public Health. Her research is focused on global health security, public health preparedness, and health diplomacy. Since 2007, much of her work has focused on the domestic and global implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR).

Since 2004, Dr. Katz has been a consultant to the Department of State, working on issues related to the Biological Weapons Convention, pandemic influenza, and disease surveillance. Dr. Katz holds a PhD from Princeton University, a Master of Public Health from Yale University, and a BA in political science from Swarthmore College.


Glen Laine, PhD

Glen LaineDr. Glen Laine is Regent’s Professor, Vice President for Research Emeritus, and Director of the Michael E. DeBakey Institute for Comparative Cardiovascular Science and Biomedical Devices at Texas A&M University. He is holder of the Wiseman-Lewie-Worth Endowed Chair in Cardiology. Dr. Laine served in the United States Army from 1967 through 1969. He began his academic career as a microbiologist working with various infectious agents. He expanded his graduate education into biophysics and biomedical engineering, applying first principles to human and animal medicine.

Dr. Laine spent a decade in a clinical department of anesthesiology and critical care medicine in the Texas Medical Center before returning to Texas A&M, where he assumed the role of Department Head of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology for approximately twenty years. He spent the past four years as the Vice President for Research at Texas A&M, leading unprecedented growth in research expenditures to just under one billion dollars per year. As Vice President, he initiated the design and construction of the Biosafety Level-3 AG biocontainment facility. This facility will accommodate the chronic study of high consequence zoonotic diseases in large animals along with the vectors responsible for transmission of disease to animals and humans. As Director of the DeBakey Institute for the past eighteen years, he has published extensively in the medical and biomedical engineering literature on fluid resuscitation and edema formation in trauma patients. Dr. Laine’s diverse background led him to a significant interest in potential pandemics resulting from either intentional (bioterrorism) or accidental release of microorganisms genetically modified, utilizing techniques common to synthetic biology, including the policies needed to ensure appropriate preparation, response, and recovery in a resilient society.


Gerald W. Parker Jr., DVM, PhD

Gerald W. Parker Jr., DVM, PhD Dr. Gerald Parker is a Senior Fellow for the Pandemic and Biosecurity Policy Programs at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service; Associate Dean for Global One Health, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine; and Strategic Advisor for the Institute for Infectious Animal Diseases at Texas A&M AgriLife Research. Dr. Parker also serves on several advisory boards, including the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine standing committee on Health Threats and Workforce Resilience; the FEMA National Advisory Council; the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee; the Biodefense Blue Ribbon Panel; and the Texas Task Force on Emerging Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response.

Prior to his appointment to Texas A&M University, Dr. Parker held technical to executive leadership positions throughout thirty-six years of public service as a recognized defense and civilian interagency leader in biodefense, high consequence emerging infectious diseases, global health security, and all-hazards public health/medical preparedness. This includes coordinating federal medical and public health responses to Hurricanes Katrina through Alex, the 2009 Pandemic, and the Haiti earthquake. Dr. Parker’s service includes more than twenty-six years on active duty, leading medical research and development programs and organizations. He is a former Commander and Deputy Commander, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Parker held senior executive-level positions at the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Defense (DOD), including serving as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response at HHS and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense at DOD.

Dr. Parker is a 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Executive Presidential Rank Award and a 2013 recipient of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Meritorious Civilian Service. Dr. Parker graduated from Texas A&M’s College of Veterinary Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.



Contact

(979) 845-6510
bushschoolscowcroft@tamu.edu

Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220


Contact

(979) 845-6510
bushschoolscowcroft@tamu.edu

Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220