Contact

(979) 845-1532
bushschoolmosbacher@tamu.edu

The Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220


Contact

(979) 845-1532
bushschoolmosbacher@tamu.edu

The Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220

Mosbacher Research Fellows

The Mosbacher Research Fellows Program recognizes individuals who have made or are committed to making significant research contributions in the area of trade, energy, governance, or public services. Our two-year fellows contribute to the Mosbacher Institute’s The Takeaway policy brief series and partner in our research endeavors.


Anupam Agrawal

Anupam Agrawal

Associate Professor, Texas A&M Mays Business School

Dr. Anupam Agrawal is an Associate Professor in the Department of Information and Operations Management at the Mays Business School. He researches, teaches, and has worked in the arena of supply chain management. In a career spanning over a decade in the industry, he has worked in various areas of supply chain; specifically, procurement, supplier development, and new product development. His research focuses on sourcing of modular components, relationships between buyers and suppliers, and learning and depreciation in supply chains, and it has informed the practice of supply chain at several firms. He teaches courses in the arena of supply chain to PhD, MBA, and undergraduate students. In his personal life, he is very actively involved with the education of underprivileged children; specifically, with Laxmi Ashram, an organization in Kausani hills in India, that works for the education of underprivileged girls.

Agrawal holds MS and PhD degrees in technology and operations from INSEAD, an MBA from IIM Calcutta, and a BTech from IIT Kanpur.




David Anderson

David Anderson

Professor and Extension Economist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Dr. David Anderson is a Professor and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Economist in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M. His work involves the analysis of livestock market economics and policy. He has authored or coauthored more than 800 journal articles, publications, symposium articles, presented papers, and popular press and other articles. He has experience analyzing the impact of policy changes, technology adoption, and alternative management strategies. He has chaired or co-chaired thirty graduate student research committees and been a member of fifty-five other graduate student committees. For the past eighteen years, he has taught Agricultural Economics 614, Ag Policy. He has received awards from the American, Western, and Southern Agricultural Economics Associations for quality of research and Extension programs and is a four-time recipient of the Extension Superior Service award.

Anderson is originally from Coolidge, Arizona, where his father is a cotton farmer. He earned two degrees in agricultural economics at the University of Arizona and a PhD in agricultural economics at Texas A&M University.




Justin B. Bullock

Justin B. Bullock

Assistant Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service

Dr. Justin B. Bullock is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Service and Administration and a Research Fellow in the Institute for Science, Technology, and Public Policy. Bullock earned his PhD in public administration and policy with a specialization in public management and public policy from the University of Georgia in 2014 as well as a master’s in public administration and a bachelor’s in business administration, also from the University of Georgia.

Bullock has a number of interests at the intersects of public administration, public management, artificial intelligence, digital governance, and digital discretion. He is interested in the effects of the rapid changes in decision-making tools and data on governance, administration, and society. He is also interested in what new opportunities, challenges, and questions these rapid changes pose for governance and society.




Amy Glass

Amy Glass

Associate Professor, Texas A&M Department of Economics

Dr. Amy Glass is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Texas A&M University, where she teaches courses on microeconomic theory, international trade, and multinational firms. Her research focuses on the connections between foreign direct investment, intellectual property rights, and technological change. Some of her best-known work examines whether stronger intellectual property rights are useful for attracting more foreign direct investment, and the overall effects of intellectual property rights on innovation, imitation, and foreign direct investment in the world economy. She has published numerous articles in such journals as the International Economic Review, the Journal of International Economics, and the Journal of Development Economics.

Previously, Glass taught at the Ohio State University and Bryn Mawr College. She served as a Visiting Foreign Scholar at the Institute of Social and Economic Research at Osaka University in Japan and worked as a summer intern at the World Bank. Glass earned a PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA in Economics (with highest honors) and English from Williams College.




Jessica Gottlieb

Jessica Gottlieb

Assistant Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service

Dr. Jessica Gottlieb joined the Bush School after earning her PhD in political science at Stanford University. She also holds a master’s degree in economics from Stanford. While at Stanford, Gottlieb received the Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship and was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Center for Democracy Development and the Rule of Law. Prior to her doctoral studies, Gottlieb worked at the Center for Global Development.

Her research focuses on the political economy of development and, in particular, constraints to government accountability in new democracies. Her past work falls into three themes: information asymmetries and voter coordination, informal institutions and clientelism, and the political implications of unequal gender norms. Much of her research has been in sub-Saharan Africa, where she has conducted field experiments, behavioral games, and surveys. Gottlieb’s current research agenda focuses on the implications of weak state capacity and informality for democratic accountability. She has published articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Quarterly Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, and World Development.




Robert Greer

Robert Greer

Assistant Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service

Dr. Robert Greer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Service and Administration and is Director of the Certificate in Public Management. He is also a Research Fellow in both the Institute for Science, Technology, and Public Policy and the Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy. Greer’s research interests are in state and local government financial management; specifically, in the areas of debt management, infrastructure finance, and environmental finance. His recent publications focus on issues of governance structure and their relationship to infrastructure finance and debt management. Current projects continue this work by considering complex networks of water districts and the connection between their fiscal capacity and performance. His work has been published in Public Administration Review, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Policy Studies Journal, Public Budgeting & Finance, Municipal Finance Journal, Urban Studies, Energy Policy, Perspectives on Public Management and Governance, and Public Finance Review.

Greer earned both his MPP and PhD from the Martin School of Public Policy and Administration, University of Kentucky, and has a BA in economics and business administration from Trinity University and an MPA from the University of North Texas. He was the recipient of the 2012 Emerging Scholar Award from the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) and was also awarded the Hatton W. Sumner Scholar Award. Greer is also a Co-PI on a $1.5 million grant on pathways to sustainable urban water security through desalination and water reuse as well as a Texas A&M T3 grant on the circular economy and sustainable development goals.




Reyko Huang

Reyko Huang

Associate Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service

Dr. Reyko Huang is an Associate Professor in the Department of International Affairs at the Bush School. Her research focuses on violent conflict, rebel organizations, and international politics. She is the author of The Wartime Origins of Democratization: Civil War, Rebel Governance, and Political Regimes (Cambridge University Press, 2016), which explores the social and institutional impacts of violent rebellion and their effects on postwar politics. Other works examine rebel diplomacy, religion and political violence, wartime social mobilization, and elite social networks among rebel organizations. Her work has been supported by fellowships from the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, where she was a Zukerman Fellow, and the United States Institute of Peace.

Huang holds a PhD in political science from Columbia University, an MPA from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, and a BA in government and economics from Cornell University.




Andy Johnson

Andy Johnson

Associate Professor, Texas A&M Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Director, Productivity and Efficiency Measurement Lab

Dr. Andrew (Andy) L. Johnson is an Associate Professor and Director of the Productivity and Efficiency Measurement Laboratory in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Texas A&M University. He obtained his BS in industrial and systems engineering from Virginia Tech and his MS and PhD from the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research interests include productivity and efficiency measurement, warehouse design and operations, material handling, and application-driven research.

Johnson is a member of the INFORMS, Institute of Industrial and System Engineers (IISE), National Eagle Scout Association, and German Club of Virginia Tech. His research team was awarded the 2017 I5 Award for most outstanding industry collaboration by IISE.




Andres Jola-Sanchez

Andres Jola-Sanchez

Assistant Professor, Texas A&M Mays Business School

Dr. Jola-Sanchez is an Assistant Professor of Operations Management at Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. His research explores the problem of war and urban crisis in the field of operations management. His research topic has roots in his extensive field experience in Colombia, where he worked as a researcher for various organizations, including the National Planning Department and the Ministry of Finance. His research provides insights to help humanitarian, commercial, and public sector organizations respond to the operational issues arising from armed conflicts. His work has appeared in journals such as Production and Operations Management and the Journal of Operations Management.

Jola-Sanchez holds a PhD in operations management and decision sciences from Indiana University, MS degrees in industrial engineering and business, and BS degrees in industrial engineering and economics.




Eric Lewis

Eric Lewis

Assistant Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service

Dr. Eric Lewis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Service and Administration at the Bush School of Government and Public Service, where he specializes in energy economics and industrial organization. He was previously an economist with the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice.

Lewis has written extensively about US land policy, oil and natural gas drilling, market efficiency, and market power. He earned a bachelor’s degree in economics and Middle East studies and Arabic from Brigham Young University and an MA in economics and a PhD in economics, both from the University of Michigan.




Richard Metters

Richard Metters

Head, Department of Information and Operations Management, Texas A&M Mays Business School

Dr. Richard Metters is the Robertson Chair of Management and Head of the Department of Information and Operations Management at the Mays Business School, Texas A&M University. His PhD was granted in 1993 from the Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina. He also holds an MBA from Duke University and a BA from Stanford University. He has taught at Emory University, Vanderbilt University, and Southern Methodist University. Prior to his academic career, he worked at Bank of America, CitiBank, and Crocker Bank (now Wells Fargo Bank).

His research interests concentrate in service sector operations management and supply chain management. He has previously published over forty academic articles in Management Science, Operations Research, Journal of Operations Management, Production and Operations Management, Harvard Business Review, and many other journals. His research has involved Kroger, BancTec, Blockbuster, the US Postal Service, Lincoln Electric Motors, Bob’s Candies, Atlanta Refreshment, American Airlines, American Express, Berol Corp., Harrah’s Entertainment, Sofitel, Ritz-Carlton, and the Vanderbilt Child Care Center. In the last decade, his research has centered on how national culture, gender, and religion influence business processes. He is the principal author of the textbook Successful Service Operations Management. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Service Operations research excellence from the Production and Operations Management Society in 2019.




Danila Serra

Danila Serra

Associate Professor, Texas A&M Department of Economics and the Bush School of Government & Public Service

Dr. Danila Serra joined Texas A&M University in Fall 2019 as an Associate Professor of economics, in a joint appointment with the Department of Economics and the Bush School’s Department of International Affairs. Serra holds a PhD in economics from Oxford University and a master of economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Serra has been a consultant for the World Bank in various projects and has conducted research both in developed and developing countries, including Ethiopia, Kenya, and Angola. In her work, she has applied novel experimental methodologies and survey design to the study of corruption, governance, and accountability. She has published numerous highly cited articles in peer-reviewed journals and edited a book on the subject. Her most recent work focuses on issues related to gender differences in education and labor market participation, gender norms, and women’s empowerment.

In November 2017, Serra was chosen as the inaugural recipient of the Vernon Smith Ascending Scholar Prize. The prize—named after the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics winner, Vernon Smith—is a “budding genius” award granted by the International Foundation for Research in Experimental Economics (IFREE) to an exceptional scholar in the field of experimental economics.




Anastasia Shcherbakova

Anastasia Shcherbakova

Assistant Professor, Texas A&M Department of Agricultural Economics

Dr. Anastasia Shcherbakova is an applied economist with expertise in economics; regulation; and policy of energy, environment, and natural resource markets. Her current research projects focus on firms’ use of non-market strategies in regulated industries and, more broadly, on the political economy of resource industries. Shcherbakova’s research on economic, financial, and regulatory questions in electricity, renewables, and oil and gas markets has been published in a number of peer-reviewed energy, environmental, and economic journals.

Shcherbakova earned a BA in economics from Knox College and a PhD in public policy from the University of Chicago.





Contact

(979) 845-1532
bushschoolmosbacher@tamu.edu

The Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220


Contact

(979) 845-1532
bushschoolmosbacher@tamu.edu

The Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy

The Bush School of Government and Public Service

Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, Texas 77843-4220