News from the Bush School

Bush School Students Evaluate and Report on Successful Ugandan Aid Project

November 20, 2018

Panelists at the Sustainability and Development Conference at the University of Michigan, November 9-11, 2018 Left to right: Jenna Kurten, Mitchell Baker, Lindsey Coleman, Darienne Davis, Marcus Jenkins, Tessa Davis, and Manuel Pina, Jr.

Panelists at the Sustainability and Development Conference at the University of Michigan, November 9-11, 2018 Left to right: Jenna Kurten, Mitchell Baker, Lindsey Coleman, Darienne Davis, Marcus Jenkins, Tessa Davis, and Manuel Pina, Jr.

Bush School students Darienne Davis and Marcus Jenkins recently joined colleagues from other Texas A&M University departments on a panel discussion at the inaugural Sustainability and Development conference held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Panelists at the Sustainability and Development Conference at the University of Michigan, November 9-11, 2018 Left to right: Marcus Jenkins, Lindsey Coleman, Darienne Davis, Tessa Davis, Jaehyun Ahn, Mitchell Baker. Manuel Pina, Jr. and Jenna Kurten

Panelists at the Sustainability and Development Conference at the University of Michigan, November 9-11, 2018 Left to right: Marcus Jenkins, Lindsey Coleman, Darienne Davis, Tessa Davis, Jaehyun Ahn, Mitchell Baker. Manuel Pina, Jr. and Jenna Kurten

Davis and Marcus joined Mitchell Baker and Lindsey Coleman—both graduate students in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications (ALEC)—in reporting key community-level impacts based on a two-month in-country evaluation of the Girl Power Program (GPP). A project of the Just Like My Child Foundation, GPP aims to transform the lives of vulnerable adolescent girls in central Uganda as they face important life decisions. GPP assists them in developing strategies that will help them achieve education and economic independence and delay marriage, which often leads to early pregnancy or disease.

GPP offers training in seventy-two schools in the Luwero Triangle, where the program has reached over 4,000 girls and community members over the past twelve years. The four Texas A&M students evaluated the program after collecting 2,669 responses to nine questions from 143 members of seven stakeholder groups from seventeen communities. The team’s advisors for the GPP evaluation research were Dr. Manuel Piña, ALEC, and Dr. Silva Hamie, Bush School.

About 500 scientists from the US and institutions and universities from all continents of the world presented completed, on-going, and projected research related to sustainable development across the planet. Conference plenary sessions addressed careers and opportunities in sustainable development, gender inequality, and food security.