Contact Admissions

In-Residence Degree Programs

Master of Public Service and Administration
Master of International Affairs

Bush School Admissions Office

(979) 862-3476
bushschooladmissions@tamu.edu

Contact Extended Education

Online & In-Residence Certificates

Advanced International Affairs
Homeland Security
Nonprofit Management

1-866-988-BUSH (2874)
bushschoolonline@tamu.edu


Contact Admissions

In-Residence Degree Programs

Master of Public Service and Administration
Master of International Affairs

Bush School Admissions Office

(979) 862-3476
bushschooladmissions@tamu.edu

Contact Extended Education

Online & In-Residence Certificates

Advanced International Affairs
Homeland Security
Nonprofit Management

1-866-988-BUSH (2874)
bushschoolonline@tamu.edu

Classes at the Bush School

November 10, 2015

In the Bush School we take 12 credits per semester, which is a heavy but doable workload (think lots of late nights!). Outside of class, the majority of us tend to keep busy as well—a few students work (I am a graduate assistant at the Bush School), a lot of people volunteer, and many more are involved with societies and events on central campus. Stay tuned for more about my social life as a Bush School student; it’s my next blog. Classes typically max out at 20 students for the core classes to an average of 8 to 10 students for elective classes. The good thing about this small-group size is that everyone participates and we have a wonderful collaborative-learning experience. Both my professors and my colleagues have different cultural backgrounds and expectations, so it keeps me on my toes! Though each class is different, my favorite first semester experience was a simulation undertaken in my core International Politics in Theory and Practice class. In order to ‘solve’ the crisis in Syria, we were grouped into organizations such as USAID, the CIA and FBI, country governments, and media teams, and for six weeks we became these people whenever we were at the school. I was a member of the TV team, and it was my job to try to get interviews/photos or bug the offices of government officials for a scoop. No one was safe, and the majority of us even maintained our new ‘personalities’ outside of those class hours. The best thing about being on the TV team was that we were able to visit the local TV station KBTX and film a full, professional broadcast. It was a lot of fun and we were so grateful to KBTX for being such wonderful hosts. Jennie
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Jennie Barber, Master of International Affairs '16