Contact Admissions

In-Residence Degree Programs

Master of Public Service and Administration
Master of International Affairs

Bush School Admissions Office

(979) 862-3476
bushschooladmissions@tamu.edu

Contact Extended Education

Online & In-Residence Certificates

Advanced International Affairs
Homeland Security
Nonprofit Management

1-866-988-BUSH (2874)
bushschoolonline@tamu.edu


Contact Admissions

In-Residence Degree Programs

Master of Public Service and Administration
Master of International Affairs

Bush School Admissions Office

(979) 862-3476
bushschooladmissions@tamu.edu

Contact Extended Education

Online & In-Residence Certificates

Advanced International Affairs
Homeland Security
Nonprofit Management

1-866-988-BUSH (2874)
bushschoolonline@tamu.edu

A student perspective: My NYC internship process

July 10, 2017

The internship process can play a critical role in your graduate education; I know for a fact that it did for me. When I first arrived at the Bush School, I wasn’t sure what type of nonprofit organization I wanted to work for. I knew it should focus upon kids and be within an educational setting, but I hadn’t yet figured out the specifics. The pressure of the internship search began but I realized that most nonprofits do not open applications until the spring semester. I had all fall to do the necessary legwork.

First, I created a list of nonprofits to apply for, including due dates, so I could apply for them in February/March. In class I learned more about the refugee crisis and heard about the International Rescue Committee (IRC). I quickly realized this was a population I wanted to serve. We had a speaker visit Dr. Paarlberg’s fundraising class; she was the Development Coordinator for the IRC office in Dallas and her talk helped seal my interest. I wanted an internship with that organization. As I began my search, I found a position in New York City (NYC) that fit perfectly with what I was looking. I visited my career advisor multiple times to ensure that my résumé and cover letter reflected everything that would attract the IRC. When I found the position online, I contacted our classroom visitor from the IRC, and told her of my interest. She quickly passed on my materials, and I was contacted by my (soon-to-be) manager the following day. I applied for the Refugee Youth Summer Academy (RYSA) External Relations Management Internship position in the NYC office, and after a month-long interview process that included submitting a hypothetical donor report, I secured the internship.

Because I received an out-of-state internship, I did receive some career services funding to help cover rent/expenses. I knew that living in NYC would be expensive, but I was prepared and excited about the opportunity. Once I found a place to live, I moved in late May and began my internship in June. I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to intern for the IRC, and specifically, at RYSA. I was able to not only learn the administrative/management side of our Education & Learning (E&L) Department in New York, but I also gained field experience working directly with refugee youth at the Academy. The Academy first and foremost provides the educational orientation that refugee and asylee youth need to integrate into the NYC public school system. I worked as an assistant under our E&L manager and was given a variety of tasks: writing two crucial donor reports, developing donor proposals, assisting with student enrollment, interpreting for Spanish-speaking families, translating documents, tracking demographic and assessment data from our M&E interns, and also managing the yearbook project that was distributed to students, parents, staff, and donors.

I was able to apply knowledge that I had gained from Dr. Brown’s nonprofit management class and Dr. Bright’s program evaluation class, which helped solidify my career path. Through this experience, I developed strong relationships with both staff and refugee students. The ability to work directly with the students helped me understand both the reality of their situation and their daily struggles before and upon arriving in America. This opportunity made me realize that I wanted to work for refugee youth and dedicate my career to ensuring that they receive not only the education they deserve, but all the rights that we as human beings are entitled to have.


Tags:

Back to the Bush School Blog homepage


Written by Adriana Perez, MPSA ‘17