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The National Public Opinion Project on the Water-Energy-Food Nexus

Social and Public Policy Dimensions

Scholarship

Click the publication for the abstract.

2017

Hannibal, Bryce. 2017. “Throwing It Out: Introducing a Nexus Perspective in Examining Citizen Perceptions of Organization Food Waste in the U.S.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association, Austin, Texas, April 12–15. Access a PDF of the presentation..


Kurian, Mathew, Kent E. Portney, Gerhard Rappold, Bryce Hannibal, and Solomon H. Gebrechorkos. 2017. “Governance of Water-Energy-Food Nexus: A Social Network Analysis Approach. Paper presented at the Water, Soil and Waste Dresden Nexus Conference: SDGS & Nexus Approach: Monitoring and Implementation, Dresden Germany. May 17–19.


Portney, Kent E., Bryce Hannibal, Carol Goldsmith, Peyton McGee, Xinsheng Liu, and Arnold Vedlitz. 2017. “Awareness of the Food-Energy-Water Nexus and Public Policy Support in the United States: Public Attitudes Among the American People.” Environment and Behavior. DOI: 10.1177/0013916517706531


2016

Hannibal, Bryce. 2016. “Cognitive Awareness of the Water-Energy-Food Nexus in the US: Public Attitudes among the American People.” Paper presented at the 111th annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Seattle, Washington, August 20–23. Co-authored with Kent Portney, Carol Goldsmith, Peyton McGee, Xinsheng Liu, and Arnold Vedlitz. Abstract

The majority of research into the connections between water and energy, water and food, and food and energy has been scientific and technical, with little research examining the publics’ understandings of these connections. This paper delves into these understandings using a 2015 national public opinion survey on the water‐energy‐food nexus. This survey asked a representative national sample of adults an array of questions to ascertain levels of awareness of nexus issues among the general public. Responses to these questions are used to create a “cognitive awareness index” for each node of the nexus – water and energy, water and food, and energy and food, with an eye toward making inferences about relative levels of understanding of the connections. These indexes are then used as independent variables to investigate the extent to which awareness is associated with willingness to support public policies designed to intervene in the nexus. The results suggest that levels of awareness vary considerably across individuals and across the nexus nodes. All three indexes are highly related to a number of policy options for mitigating problems or strengthening synergies associated with the connections. We discuss implications of these findings for public policies, with recommendations for improved awareness and policy interventions that are most likely to be supported. The results strongly suggest that awareness of the water‐energy‐food nexus may represent conditions necessary for supporting policy responses and that building awareness of nexus issues could represent an important pathway for increasing support for policy interventions.Hide


Hannibal, Bryce. 2016. “Political Ideology and the Invisible Environment: A Multi-Level Analysis of Biophysical Impacts on Individual Behaviors and Attitudes about Water.” Paper presented at the 111th annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Seattle, Washington, August 20–23. Co-authored with Arnold Vedlitz. Abstract

Water-related environmental challenges have increased in importance and prevalence in recent years, and will likely continue to be addressed as important environmental issues. Research addressing how biophysical water issues influences individual attitudes and behaviors regarding water is underspecified. To address this gap, this manuscript examines the extent to which local environmental incidents and hazards influence an individuals’ attitudes and behaviors about water. We use public nationally-representative opinion data as well as data from SHELDUS, the USDM, and FEMA to examine county-level contextual factors. Our results show that very few biophysical indicators influence individual attitudes and behaviors about water, which are instead influenced by sociodemographic and political characteristics, of which political ideology is a prominent influencing factor. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that growing negative environmental experiences surrounding water will lead Americans to shift behaviors and attitudes more generally towards investments in new water policy proposals.Hide


Portney, Kent. 2016. “Cognitive Awareness of the Food-Energy-Water Nexus: Ideological and Policy Perspectives.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 1–4. Co-authored with Bryce Hannibal, Carol Goldsmith, Peyton McGee, Xinsheng Liu, and Arnold Vedlitz. Access the powerpoint presentation..


Bowman, Ann O’M. 2016. “Exploring Citizens’ Support for Policy Tools at the Food, Energy, Water Nexus.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 1–4. Co-authored with Justin Bullock. Access the powerpoint presentation..


McGee, Peyton. 2016. Public Opinion on Agriculture and Food Policies, Programs, and Management: An Analysis of Results from the National Water-Energy-Food Nexus Survey. College Station, TX: Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy, The Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University. Access the report PDF. Abstract

This report presents some of the results from the 2015 National Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus Survey, conducted under the auspices of the Bush School’s Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy (ISTPP). This report analyzes the responses to questions that measure a variety of attitudes about agriculture and food asked of a large nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The questionnaire spanned a number of related topics, including peoples’ concern about food availability, trust in different government agencies and levels of government, trust in other types of organizations, concerns about agricultural production, and public policy preferences.Hide

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