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Class of 2018 Spotlights


Heba Baig

Heba BaigMajor: MPSA, Nonprofit Management Track, Concentration in Education Policy
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Houston, Texas

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Diversity and inclusion creates a more effective learning environment. I attended schools where I was always one of a few Muslim students. Although those environments were not diverse, I believe that both schools had a great sense of inclusion. I never felt insecure in my beliefs because of the people around me. I believe this positively impacted my confidence as a person. My peers were able to learn more about the world through me, and I learned through them. The Diversity and Inclusion Committee strives to build a culture of practicing inclusion. Being a part of that culture is important to me. It has had such an impact on me that I believe it can make a big impact on someone else at the Bush School.

Before coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before coming to the Bush School I was serving as an AmeriCorps VISTA at CollegeCommunityCareer (CCC). CCC is a Houston area nonprofit that fosters a college-going culture with low-income, first-generation high school students and families. At CCC I was the Financial Aid and College Success Coordinator, where I worked with students to help them financially afford to reach their full potential and attend college. Changing their lives and the lives of their family.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I love to read and bake in my spare time. I find a good novel or biography can transport you into the life of a character and relax. I’m a huge Harry Potter nerd, and the last book I read was I am Malala. Baking cookies, cakes, cupcakes, and pies is another way I like to relax. I like to use cake decorating as a creative outlet, and the results are usually pretty sweet too.


Morgan Gray

Morgan GrayMajor: MPSA, Public Management track, with concentrations in State and Local Government, and Environment, Energy and Technology Policy and Management.
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: San Antonio, TX

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
As a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation, I spent the majority of my formative years living within a community disconnected from my tribe and indigenous culture. I noticed that within the public school system I attended, there was little in place that provided support for minorities and students representing diverse populations. Cultural understanding and mutual respect were not actively encouraged in the classroom or within social settings, and I became quite discouraged about the future of diversity and inclusion within the school system. I soon developed a passion for promoting and working towards establishing inclusivity of all cultures within both educational and social settings. I firmly believe that when issues arise in either setting, diversity aids in establishing the most effective solution for all involved. The opportunity to draw upon the wisdom and learning experiences of all cultures results in a collaboration of the most effective solutions.

Before coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Prior to my time at the Bush School, I attended Texas A&M University as a political science major and graduated in the spring of 2016. I spent two consecutive summers working and studying in Washington D.C. I worked for Senator Feinstein as a researcher on issues regarding Indian Affairs and Intelligence, while studying self-determination within tribal communities at George Washington University. I later worked at the Department of Energy as a research intern for the Office of NEPA Policy Compliance while also studying at American University.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
In my free time I enjoy practicing yoga, learning to cook Italian dishes, and quoting my favorite “The Office” episodes.


Lia Epps

Lia EppsMajor: SA
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Orlando, FL

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Diversity and inclusion matters to me because I believe everyone should have the opportunity to be comfortable in the skin they’re in. People deserve to be exactly who are they and not be judged. Furthermore, it’s important for everyone to know how to engage in difficult conversations and speak/act respectful towards people of different backgrounds.

Before coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
I was serving in an AmeriCorps program called FEMA Corps where I was a team leader for seven people, ages 18-24. We traveled across the country responding to disasters and helped people recover from disasters in a number of ways such as rebuilding homes and helping communities come up with preparedness plans.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
My faith is very important to me; I’m heavily involved in church. I also enjoy the arts, particularly writing poetry, singing, and playing the piano. When I have the time, I also enjoy reading a good book, I’m currently reading The New Jim Crow.


Alexa Aragonez

Alexa AragonezMajor: MPSA, Public Management, State & Local Government
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Arlington, TX

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Creating a respectful environment that allows the free communication of experiences and ideas better equips us as future public servants to answer and face the problems we encounter. Though the instrumentality of diversity and inclusion is undeniable, my answer to why diversity and inclusion matter is much simpler: every person is worthy of being included. I can only hope to communicate that concept during my time at the Bush School and after.

Before coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
In May 2016, I graduated from Texas Christian University (TCU) with a BS in political science and a BS in communication studies. During my time at TCU, I worked with the Blue Zones Project, a nonprofit that works with city officials and community members to create healthier communities by making healthy choices the easy choices, and hosted community events highlighting the Blue Zone lifestyle.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I spent the last summer DIY-ing and crafting to my heart’s content. I like to weightlift to get my mind off school. Socially, I like to host family dinners and cook for friends. I make a mean salsa!


Stefania Hristov

Stefania HristovMajor: MPSA, Public Management, Human Resource Management
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Iasi, Romania

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
I think that diversity and inclusion are the necessary ingredients of the recipe of success. Growing up in Romania and moving to the United States at the age of fifteen, I learned how important it is to value diversity and inclusion. My mother always used to tell me that everyone has a different story and perspective that I should embrace and learn from every person I interact with. Being an international student at the Bush school and Texas A&M helps me better understand the importance of diversity and inclusion. I consider myself fortunate to be part of such an amazing program where I can interact and learn from everyone around me.

Before coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before coming to the Bush School, I graduated from Texas A&M University with a bachelor’s degree in human resource and business. I am originally from Romania but moved to the United States to graduate high school and attend college. During my time at Texas A&M University, I served as a team captain of the TAMU Women’s Tennis Team from my sophomore to senior year, and I also was a representative of the SEC Student Athlete Advisory Committee. During my senior year in college, I worked with a local nonprofit organization in Bryan, Voices for Children, helping them improve their recruiting and training process for volunteers. I also traveled all around Europe, North America, and South America to compete in international tennis pro events.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
In my free time I enjoy reading books, going to coffee shops, and spending time with my friends.


Carol Oluwadamilola Adebowale

Carol Oluwadamilola AdebowaleMajor: International Affairs, International Development and Economic Policy, Transfer Pricing and Geographic Information Systems
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Abuja, Nigeria and Cypress, Texas

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Diversity and inclusion matters to me because it’s part of who I am. Simply put, diversity is important to me because I believe that every person I meet is important and with that they should always feel welcomed and valued. Because of this I strive to make every individual I meet feel welcomed, wanted, and most all, feel like they can come to me with any problem that they have.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Prior to my coming to the Bush School, I worked at a Private construction firm in the estimating department. This involved working closely with the two owners Ken and Jeff Kilgore. Working for Ken and Jeff Kilgore peaked my interest in estimating of HVAC equipment for both general contractors and private contractors. Because of this began taking CAD classes to better understand the logistics behind construction blueprints and estimating of HVAC equipment. While working at Kilgore, I was involved in numerous volunteer groups because, well, there is nothing I love more than to dedicate myself to my community.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
When I am not studying, or reading, which rarely ever happens because I live at the Bush School, I eat, volunteer, cycle, and run. I also enjoy getting my Bush School family involved in these three activities as much as I can, because it gives me a chance to get to know them a little better and it also helps them get to know the pizza loving cyclist and runner who never sleeps.


Peiquan Lin

Peiquan LinMajor: SA, Public Policy Analysis
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Fujian, China

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Diversity and inclusion became one of the important reasons why I decided to pursue my graduate school in the U.S., after I completed my exchange-student program in Philadelphia three years before. As an international student, living in a different country is both exciting and a challenge. Diversity and inclusion means a mutually respectful environment. You can love your own culture, share your own ideas even though they are different, and speak for yourself. Intercultural empathy is my favorite words in English, and it can only live in a diversified and inclusive environment. It doesn’t matter what skin colors you are, what languages you speak, or what countries you from. We are in this country, we exchange our ideas, get to know each other, and create strong friendships. Everyone has a sense of belonging and freedom. This is the reason why diversity and inclusion is amazing.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
I graduated from Capital University of Economics and Business in Beijing, China with a bachelor degree in law. During my 4 years of undergrad I participated in many internships in different fields to figure out what I want to do. From being an editor in Life Style Media Group, a court clerk assistant at Fengtai District Court, Beijing, an assistant regional coordinator in Siemens Leadership Excellence, one of co-founders of student-initiated organization aiming in bridge gap between NGOs and university talents, to an assistant researcher in Center for Beijing Science Policy I did them all. After college, I had a year full-time internship at Project Hope, an NGO in China, as both an assistant researcher and a volunteer teacher. This experience changed my mind. I realize what an influence public policy has in people’s life, and how the public sector helps. So this experience became an important reason to pursue my master degree in Public Service and Administration in the Bush School.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I love to work out, hangout with my friends, or just stay at home and read or watch movies. I’ve met some really good friends here in College Station. We try different dishes from our different cultures, explore Texas, and attending events such as the women’s march in Austin. Spending time with them really help me survive in the graduate school. If I have a longer break, I like to travel. I always believe the more places you go, the more cultures you see, the broader horizon and mind you have, and the more inclusive you become.


Erick S. Taylor Jr.

Erick S. Taylor Jr. Major: MPSA, Public Management, Collegiate Athletics and Higher Education
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Albany, GA

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
I am a first generation college graduate hailing from one of the most impoverished cities in the nation. Here I am now, attending one of the first-rate institutions in the nation on scholarship, and I do not see very many African American males in my class or in the nation that can say the same. My story is one that could have gone in numerous different ways, but I did not come to a higher place without the intention of reaching back to others. That said, diversity matters to me because, though my accomplishments are not small, they should not be as rare as they are. Diversity matters because the American dream of social upward mobility should be true for every child born under this flag and not just those born in a position of privilege.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before attending the Bush School, I attended Georgia State University completing course work in December 2015. I attended post-baccalaureate courses and remained as a full-time intern in the Athletic department during the Spring 2016 semester. Through my work in collegiate athletics, I helped fundraise for student-athlete scholarships and capital projects including Georgia State’s recent purchase of Turner Field in Downtown Atlanta.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I believe in the philosophy of sound mind and sound body so I spend much of my time outside of schoolwork working out. When I am not working out I can be found watching Japanese anime or superhero shows like Smallville or The Flash. I enjoy these works of fiction in my downtime because in a world as complex as ours, it is fun to check out sometimes and enjoy the idealisms that I hold true to be expressed through another person’s art form. Outside of all of this, I can constantly be found listening to music as a calming and motivating force in my life.


Tobias J. Oder

Tobias J. OderMajor: International Affairs, National Security & Diplomacy, American Foreign Policy & Diplomacy, International Politics & Grand Strategy
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Stuttgart, Germany

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Because diversity enables us to step out of our comfort zones and engage with a wide variety of different viewpoints and cultures that enrich our own experiences, broaden our horizons, and challenge our preconceptions and ideas we have about other people and the world. I believe that we can learn something from everyone’s experience they had, no matter where they are from. Inclusion is necessary not despite, but because of disagreements, different opinions, and cultural differences.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
I received my Bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Jena in Germany. During this time, I spent one year at Louisiana State University, where I found my passion for U.S. politics, foreign policy, and international affairs. I gave classes at my undergraduate institution in scientific research methods and interned at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies. I also continue to work with multiple organizations to strengthen foreign policy discourse in Germany and transatlantic relations, such as the German Council Foreign Relations and the Young Transatlantic Initiative. Right before I came to the Bush School, I completed one year of graduate school in International Affairs at the University of Frankfurt, Germany.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
Being a big football fan, I like to spend my weekends watching the New England Patriots or the Fighting Texas Aggies on the field. I also like to spend my free time at the gym, whether it is working out, swimming, or running. However, after a long day at the Bush School, the thing I appreciate the most is watching Netflix and having a glass of wine.


Lela Akiashvili

Lela AkiashviliMajor: MPSA, Public Management
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Tbilisi, Georgia

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
The Earth is a planet of unlimited possibilities. Each person in this world can achieve all they want if they believe. For achieving our dreams, we need to leave our bubble, go beyond our comfort zone, explore the world, see how diverse and different people can be, and learn from them. Diversity enriches us! It opens our eyes in a different way and allows us to see that the horizon is much broader than we imagined. Diversity matters, because diversity brings an opportunity to open ourselves and learn from others in the most natural and constructive environment.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before coming to the Bush School I had a pleasure of working in governmental, nonprofit, and international spheres. While working at UNICEF, I had an opportunity to cooperate with high-level external partners and participate in policy development process for the country. Before UN, I worked at the Prosecutor’s Office of Georgia, where I contributed to developing a new position of a Victim-Witness Advocate in the Criminal Justice System of Georgia. I’ve supported war-affected communities since 2008 by providing training, protecting rights, educating, coaching, and consulting. I enjoy being a trainer and have conducted more than 50 training in different countries of Europe. In 2012 I founded a youth organization called “Start Now” and chaired it for four years. These experiences made me realize the importance of diversity in every sphere.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I am blessed to have a beautiful family and try to spend all my time outside school with my husband. We enjoy cooking, traveling, exploring new lands. Gladly, we still have a lot to see in the US. I also enjoy skype-ing with parents, siblings, and other friends.


Wiam Ayachi

Wiam AyachiMajor: International Affairs, National Security and Diplomacy, Grand Strategy and Middle East
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Dallas, Texas

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Diversity is important because it allows us to grow outside our boundaries, break away from preconceived assumptions, and let go of any uncertainties we may have. It helps us learn more about our differences and use them to create a more cohesive and understanding environment where we are able to build on each other’s strengths.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
I graduated a year early from UT Dallas with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and criminology in 2015 and interned with a non-profit organization, Helping Hand. My internship eventually led me to volunteer in Port au Prince, Haiti in the spring. I then spent the summer studying Arabic in Tangier, Morocco through the State Department’s CLS program. I taught high school social studies the following year at a school in Garland, Texas and now I’m here.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
Kickboxing and cooking Middle Eastern food are my two stress relievers when I’m here in Texas. If I’m fortunate enough to be close to water, I like to go cliff diving for fun.


Marita Ivonne Jimenez

Marita Ivonne JimenezMajor: International Affairs, International Economic Development Policy (IDEP), Conflict and Development, Women Peace and Security, American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Eagle Pass, TX

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
I grew on a Mexican-American border town in the two cities that were in many manners dependent on one another. I attended school in both countries back and forth and learnt to love and appreciate both deeply. Traveling to various places of the world has also helped me develop an appreciation for both similarities and differences in in ideas, cultures and traditions. I was sitting in an all-female monastery in Bhutan once speaking to a girl my age and I noticed how although we grew up and lived in different places of the globe in some ways she and I were very similar. Diversity and inclusion is important for me because I firmly believe that an appreciation and interest of diverse backgrounds helps build better and stronger bonds between people helping create a community where individuals know you both understand genuinely care about them.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
I completed my undergraduate degree at Texas A&M University Kingsville where I majored in History and Political Science with a minor in International Studies. Before coming to the Bush School, I had a summer internship in La Paz, Bolivia with Foundation UNIR Bolivia, monitoring social conflict in the media. I traveled to Europe with my grandfather and got the opportunity to simply enjoy spending more time with my family.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
When I am not at the Bush School, some activities I especially like to do are reading for leisure, baking and spending time with my dogs and talking to my family or with friends. I find peace in yoga and running. I also enjoy volunteering in community events, it makes me very happy to both interact with both other fellow students and the broader city community.


Megi Llubani

Megi LlubaniMajor: MPSA; Policy Analysis Track; State and Local Government Concentration
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Tirana, Albania

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
I grew up in a largely homogenous country. The only place I could find diversity was in the books I read, which made me travel through my imagination to different cultures. Traveling for work and coming to the Bush School exposed me to fascinating people from around the world and their unique experiences and perspectives on life. Accepting the differences of others and being open to embark in a journey to their understanding of the world removes the inherent preconceived notions we develop. Diversity of thought is what drives human development and progress. Diversity of values and cultures is what ought to make us more empathetic.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before coming to the Bush School I was working for a think tank in Albania focused on women’s rights. Specifically advocating for increased participation of women in local and state politics as well as pushing for gender sensitive policies at the local level. I have been a civil society activist since 2011, trying to contribute to good governance and holding politicians accountable.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I spend some of my free time reading short novels, as there is no time in our busy schedule for heavily engaging books. I try to explore cinematography from different countries as much as I can. I am currently fixated on Iran. I enjoy swimming and exploring the culinary scene of College Station.


Nike Pulda

Nike PuldaMajor: International Affairs; National Security and Diplomacy; Intelligence as an Instrument of Statecraft; International Politics and Grand Strategy; Women, Peace, and Security
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Vienna, Austria

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
“The kind of world order which we the peace-loving nations must achieve must depend essentially on friendly human relations, on acquaintance, on tolerance, on unassailable sincerity and good will and good faith.” (Roosevelt, 1944) Roosevelt said these lines in 1944, but I think they are still highly valid. I deeply believe in what he was saying. 70 years later with a world population of over seven billion, we cannot demand that everyone gets along and everyone is the same. However, we can learn to embrace the differences and use it in a way that we can profit. The most important tools, I believe, to achieve this are curiousness and openness for new things. As well as respect for each other and tolerance. Live and let live. Without that, life will be hard. Wouldn’t the world be the most boring place if everyone is the same?

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before coming to the Bush School, I was studying Political Science and most recently, working for the Austrian Chancellery. In my free time, I enjoyed attending international relations-related symposia and conferences as well as attending concerts and museums, reading, and being outside with my dog.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I miss the city life and the accompanying independence a lot. So on the weekends, I try to get people together to rent a car and get out of College Station. Apart from that, I like listening to music, being outside, and watching a show series. Whenever I can, I try to volunteer for PSO. Additionally, I always make time to be on the phone with my boyfriend, friends, and family at home.


Mario E. Martinez

Mario E. MartinezMajor: MPSA, Public Policy Analysis, Security Policy
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Fort Worth, Texas

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
As future public servants, I think we should value diversity and the benefits associated with a diverse and inclusive society. I believe the Bush School has created a learning environment, where we can appreciate and respect the different perspectives and points of view from our peers. I think there is great value in learning from each other, especially when we all have different backgrounds and experiences. For me, diversity and inclusion is essential in our pursuit of public service. I think the Bush School has taught us the importance of embracing these beliefs and taking them with us when we leave.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before attending the Bush School, I graduated from Texas A&M University with a B.A. in Political Science. During my time at Texas A&M, I spent a semester in Washington D.C. interning with Texas A&M University System, which was a wonderful learning experience, especially for someone who hardly leaves Texas. During my last year of undergrad, I became involved with TAMU Reads and Counts program, which allows college students to visit local elementary schools and tutoring young students. This is my second year with the program and I have enjoyed spending time with these young students. Plus, the students get excited when you tell them you’re in college and you show them your Aggie ring.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
In my free time, I enjoy taking long naps after class, usually 2-3 hours long. Also, I play video games (Halo & Rock Band) very frequently, probably the main reason why I do not get enough sleep during the week. When it comes to television, I enjoy watching Game of Thrones, the Walking Dead, and re-runs of the Big Bang Theory.


Metra Mehran

Metra Mehran Major: MPSA, Public Policy Analysis, State Building and Economic Development
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Afghanistan

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
Diversity and inclusion matters to me because it creates an environment that respects and values individual difference along varying dimensions. I believe, everyone has something unique about them to bring to the table, and with everyone’s strengths being used together, we can make anything better. Living as a woman in patriarchal society of Afghanistan and as a Muslim now in US, I have directly experienced how absence of different opinion, sex, religion, and color on the table can adversely affect effectiveness. Therefore, I try to engage in activities where I can broaden my horizon and add a new perspective into that community. It is not only enriching my educational experiences but also bolstering understanding, cultural conversations, and harmony, and diminishing mistrust, and stereotypes among us.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
I am particularly interested in women’s empowerment and education. I majored in political science and public administration with a minor in law at the American University of Afghanistan (Afghanistan), graduating in December 2014. Before joining Bush School, I was working with different local and international organizations in Afghanistan in different capacities including executive director, program manager and project manager. Before coming to US, I was working as program manager at DFID Afghanistan, I was responsible for a multi-million-pound flagship civil society program that seeks to improve governance in Afghanistan through an inclusive civil society able to engage effectively on issues of human rights, access to justice, anti-corruption, peace building, and conflict resolution. In addition, I do volunteer works to promote civic activism, empower women, and encourage girl’s education at grassroots level. I also write opinion papers to local and international outlets about issues in Afghanistan.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
I usually try to participate in volunteer activities arranged by different associations inside the Bush School. I have an online class where I coach a girl’s debate team. I follow two TV Shows, Homeland and House of Cards, and often like to go swimming.


Rebecca Leppert

Rebecca LeppertMajor: Public Service and Administration; Public Management, Certificate in Nonprofit Management
Year Expected to Graduate: 2018
Hometown: Arlington, TX

Why do diversity and inclusion matter to you?
One of the most beautiful things about our world is our differences. Not only should these differences be respected, but they should also be revered as they bring their own unique perspectives from a vast array of heritages, ethnicities, cultures, religions, and so much more. I went to an undergraduate university that was so diverse in its student body that you could guarantee in a class of twenty-five, no two people were from the same state or country, and I loved it. Learning about each other’s differences helps people connect with others, understand each other, and create an inclusive environment where all voices feel heard and acknowledged.

Prior to coming to the Bush School, what were you doing?
Before I came to the Bush School, I was at Barry University in Miami, Florida. With an opportunity to go to school on a full scholarship, I moved to Miami, where I completed my bachelor’s in political science with a minor in history in three years. My time at school outside of classes was spent as President of the National Society for Leadership and Success. I also interned in the summers at the City of Arlington’s Management Resources Department and at a private political consulting firm. Traveling is a huge part of my life, so in my undergraduate years, I traveled to Atlanta; Washington, DC; Puerto Rico; and Costa Rica.

When not studying or reading for school, what do you do for fun or relaxation?
When I am not studying for school, I like to take some time to recharge and relax by reading books (I am a hopeless romantic), working out at the gym, and having wine and movie nights with my friends. I am also a sports fanatic as I follow the NFL, MLB, and NHL year around, so watching the games on TV and in person is a necessity. Riding horses is another passion of mine, and when I can, I like to get out and ride. I hope to one day in my career own my own ranch of horses and open it up to people with disabilities or veterans with PTSD as a form of therapy. Of course, when I can, I like to go home to see my family. There is nothing like a hug from your parents and playtime with your nieces and nephews.

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